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Joshua Kelly
Joshua Kelly

Play Subtitles English



To change the default subtitles language in Settings, go to Settings > Video and Audio > Audio > Subtitle Language, then choose the language that you want. If you don't want automatic subtitles and you're using an Apple TV, go to Settings > Video and Audio, then turn off Automatic Subtitles. If you're using a smart TV or streaming device, go to Settings > General, then turn off Automatic Subtitles.




Play subtitles English



If you don't see subtitles or language options, they might not be available for that show or movie. Check the show or movie descriptions page in the Apple TV app to find out what subtitles or languages are available.


Subtitle and caption files contain the text of what is said in the video. It also contains timestamps for when each line of text should be displayed. Some files also include position and style info, which is especially useful for deaf or hard-of-hearing viewers.


Captions (subtitles) are available on videos where the owner has added them, and on some videos where YouTube automatically adds them. You can change the default settings for captions on your computer or mobile device.


As the lines between subtitles and captions continue to blur, perhaps none has become more confusing than the difference between subtitles for the d/Deaf and hard of hearing (SDH) and closed captions (CC).


Both subtitles and captions are timed text files synchronized to media content, allowing the text to be viewed at the same time the words are being spoken. Captions and subtitles can be open or closed.


SDH often emulates closed captions on media that does not support closed captions, such as digital connections like HDMI or OTT platforms. In recent years, many streaming platforms, like Netflix, have been unable to support standard broadcast Line 21 closed captions. This has led to a demand for English SDH subtitles styled similarly to FCC-compliant closed captions instead.


SDH subtitles and closed captions are both capable of supporting placement. Viewers often find SDH and CC are placed in the bottom center, with movement to the top to avoid lower thirds. Some styles of CC may include horizontal placement to indicate speaker changes.


Streaming services that follow this trend include Netflix and Amazon. Encoding The move from analog television to high-definition (HD) media over the last 20 years had major implications for the encoding of closed captions and subtitles.


HD disc media, like Blu-ray, does not support traditional closed captioning but is compatible with SDH subtitles. The same goes for some streaming services and OTT platforms. SDH formats are increasingly used on these platforms due to their inability to support traditional Line 21 broadcast closed captions. That being said, some classic captioning formats, like SCC, have proven to be versatile across television and digital formats.


PowerPoint for Microsoft 365 can transcribe your words as you present and display them on-screen as captions in the same language you are speaking, or as subtitles translated to another language. This can help accommodate individuals in the audience who may be deaf or hard of hearing, or more familiar with another language, respectively.


You can choose which language you want to speak while presenting, and which language the caption/subtitle text should be shown in (i.e. if you want it to be translated). You can select the specific microphone you want to be used (if there is more than one microphone connected to your device), the position where the subtitles appear on the screen (bottom or top, and overlaid or separate from slide), and other display options.


Use Subtitle Language to see which languages PowerPoint can display on-screen as captions or subtitles, and select the one you want. This is the language of the text that will be shown to your audience. By default, this will be the same language as your Spoken Language, but it can be a different language, meaning that translation will occur.


In the Subtitle Settings menu, set the desired position of the captions or subtitles. They can appear over the top or bottom margin of the slide (overlaid), or they can appear above the top or below the bottom of the slide (docked). The default setting is Below Slide.


To have subtitles always start up when a Slide Show presentation starts, from the ribbon you can navigate to Slide Show > Always Use Subtitles to turn this feature on for all presentations. (By default, it's off.) Then, in Slide Show and Presenter View, a live transcription of your words will appear on-screen.


You can choose which language you want to speak while presenting, and which language the caption/subtitle text should be shown in (i.e., if you want it to be translated). You can also select whether subtitles appear at the top or bottom of the screen.


Use Subtitle Language to see which languages PowerPoint can display on-screen as captions or subtitles, and select the one you want. This is the language of the text that will be shown to your audience. (By default, this will be the same language as your Spoken Language, but it can be a different language, meaning that translation will occur.)


Several spoken languages are supported as voice input to live captions & subtitles in PowerPoint for Microsoft 365. The languages marked as Preview are offered in advance of full support, and generally will have somewhat lower accuracy, which will improve over time.


PowerPoint live captions & subtitles is one of the cloud-enhanced features in Microsoft 365 and is powered by Microsoft Speech Services. Your speech utterances will be sent to Microsoft to provide you with this service. For more information, see Make Office Work Smarter for You.


Specifically, while foreign-language subtitles tend to lead to better learning outcomes for most people, students who are just beginners might struggle with them. As such, if you have only limited proficiency in your target language, it might be better for you to use subtitles in your native language first, until you feel comfortable with having both the audio and the subtitles in the foreign language.


So far, we discussed the two most common schemes which are used when viewing foreign-language material; these consist of an audio/soundtrack in the foreign language, together with subtitles in the foreign language or in the native language.


Reverse subtitles are subtitles in the foreign language, which appear together with a soundtrack in the native language. In some areas of language learning, such as vocabulary learning, these subtitles can be preferable to native-language subtitles on a foreign-language soundtrack.


Dual subtitles are subtitles that use a foreign-language soundtrack, together with subtitles in both the foreign and the native language. This means that these subtitles provide the most information out of all types of subtitles. This can be advantageous, by giving you as a learner more valuable input, but the problem is that there is often not enough time to process all this input while watching a show.


Note that some platforms offer a special type of dual subtitles, where you only see the foreign-language subtitles normally, but hovering over a specific word shows you its native-language translation, while pausing the show.


The following instructions apply to the Windows Media player. The steps to be followed depend upon the version of the player installed. Note: After making the selections described, it may be necessary to close down Windows Media player and restart it for the changes you have made to take effect.


Please note that it is recommended that you choose to view the video from the FDA page rather than downloading the video file to preserve captioning. If the video is downloaded captions may not be displayed because your WMV player cannot find the captioning ("SAMI") file stored on the web server.


If you want to automatically select English subtitles, then put "English" (not "en") in the "Subtitle language" field and it should automatically select the English language subtitles from your file if it is available. This likely does not work if the language is not properly tagged in the file, and I don't think it is possible to select the second English subtitles as you specified automatically.


SUBTITLESThese are different for some reason; I guess it's as the user above said, and subtitle track IDs begin after the audio track IDs end. My particular subtitle options were "disabled", "(signs/songs) English" and "English subtitles". For English subs, this is what worked for me:


Some people think that watching a film with subtitles in their native language will help them learn. The idea is that you can hear the English word and pair it with the word in your native language. The result is that you learn the word.


That concept can be applied to subtitles. If watching a movie in English without subtitles is too difficult, subtitles can bring it back into that zone of proximal development where effective learning happens. 041b061a72


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